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Frequently Asked Questions

Perhaps it is because of the nature of the books that David writes, perhaps it is because David Weber's fans are unusually dedicated and inquisitive... but it seems that everyone has a question! Here are a few that David finds he gets asked most often.

If you have a question that you would like to see considered as a FAQ, please e-mail us at faq@davidweber.net. Responses will be posted if and when David can get to them. We'd love to hear from you! 

Series Question Posted
Miscellaneous From Fumitaka Joe:Is "Out of the Dark" the first book in a new series (as indicated in at least one review of the ARC) or is it a standalone book? September 2010

Currently it is a stand alone book, which is an expansion of a short story that David wrote for the Warriors anthology. David's editor at Tor likes it well enough that he has asked David to consider expanding it to a series.

Hope that helps!

Honorverse I've just finished with "A Rising Thunder," and I've got to know...what's the next Honorverse book? September 2010

Interesting question. "Fire Season," by David Weber and Jane Lindskold, which is the second of the young adult series set in the Honorverse that features Stephanie Harrington, will be released in October of 2012. David has also finished the next Honorverse book, tentatively called "Shadow of Freedom," due out in 2013. Eric Flint and David are also collaborating on another book, tentatively called, "Cauldron Boil, Cauldron Bubble" (or some other phrase from MacBeth...) which will hopefully also be released in 2013.

Honorverse What order am I supposed to read the Honor Harrington/Honorverse books? September 2010

Great Question! David originally intended the books to be read in order by publication date, but that's gotten a little complicated. Check out our handy list, contributed by Christine Acker!

http://www.davidweber.net/downloads/28-honorverse-timeline-1.html

General Okay, we love David's work and we would like to invite him to be our guest at a Sci-Fi Con/Book Fair/Writing Conference/etc. What do we need to know and who do we need to talk to? January 2010

Due to David's writing schedule and having 3 kids, he is only able to do about 5-6 events a year, including the events that his publisher requests. We are always glad to consider your convention, but currently we are booking about two years ahead for cons. E-mail  duckk@davidweber.net with all of the pertinent information, and we'll get back to you as soon as possible!

Safehold Okay, So I'm dying to know...how long does David think that this series is going to be? And will the inhabitants of Safehold ever meet the Gbaba? August 2009

David is currently anticipating that the Safehold series will be a minimum of nine books. And, he is currently planning for the humans of Safehold to run back into the Gbaba at some point...but that's all the details I could squeeze out of him!

Safehold I've just finished reading the most recent Safehold book, and I've got to know, what is the name of the next Safehold novel, and when is the publication date? July 2009

David is currently writing one per year. The next Safehold release is titled Hell's Foundations Quiver, with the release in November of 2015.

Empire of Man Is David ever going to give John Ringo the outline for the next Empire of Man book? In an interview a while back, John Ringo said he had been waiting for a while and was looking forward to writing the next book. July 2009

First, and this is really the point that is holding up both of them, is the fact that David and John Ringo both have several contracted books that they are due to write and they honestly haven't had a break in their writing schedules for quite a while. When they both have a break together, David will prepare an outline, and (since you have read David's work, I'm sure you can understand this) David never does anything short...In fact he has written short stories that have managed to grow into a full novels! So, yes, David does have to do an outline for John to work from, but it isn't something he can just sit down and write out at breakfast. David assures me that it is a story he wants to continue, but he won't be continuing the Prince Roger storyline, rather he will be going back and telling the prequel story of Miranda McClintock, the founder of the Empire of Man. So, David says there will definitely, definitely be a continuation of the story, but he's not sure of exactly when!

Honorverse What are the books of the original Honor Harrington series? July 2009
The (Only) Honor Harrington Books:
 
1. On Basilisk Station (1993)
2. The Honor of the Queen (1993)
3. The Short Victorious War (1994)
4. Field of Dishonor (1994)
5. Flag in Exile (1995)
6. Honor Among Enemies (1996)
7. In Enemy Hands (1997)
8. Echoes of Honor (1998)
9. Ashes of Victory (2000)
10. War of Honor (2002)
11. At All Costs (2005)
12. Mission of Honor (2010)
 
But please take the time to enjoy the other Honorverse books too, especially Crown of Slaves (2003), Storm from the Shadows (2009), and Torch of Freedom (2009) - they are advancing the plotline for the entire story arc, besides just being really great reads!
 
Multiverse I really loved the Multiverse series! When can we expect book three? July 2009

In the Hell's Gate series, there are two more books under contract, but the project is in hiatus while David tries to catch up with his writing schedule. He has told people at Cons that he had no business starting "still another series", but he wanted to tell the story so badly that he bit off more than he could chew. This was actually one of the original series that he pitched to Jim Baen all those years ago, and he's been itching to get it told. It's a good story!

**Update: David understands that these books are very much in demand by his fans, and hopes to make room in his schedule to begin working on the next one sometime this year. 

Honorverse Please explain prolong. What generation is Honor Harrington? May 2009

There are currently three generations of prolong. The term "generation" has nothing to do with descent or parentage; it refers to the version or variant of prolong available.

First Generation Prolong: May be administered up to the age of about 25; normally administered about 16; may be administered pre-puberty but virtually never is. Aside from the case covered in the 3rd sentence of the next paragraph, 3rd generation prolong works equally well for everyone, regardless of genetic makeup. Stops the aging process in the early 20s. Does not slow physical healing times and/or extend pregnancy periods, etc.

In addition to the above, 2nd and 3rd generation prolong are expected to extend the "frozen" aging process by about 20% and 33%, respectively, over 1st generation prolong. (That is, they will both stop the aging process earlier and keep it stopped longer.) Also, for reasons which are still subject to investigation, it does appear that the children of prolong recipients respond more strongly to the same or later generations of the prolong therapies. 3rd generation also plays less havoc with hormone balances and so forth than 1st or 2nd generation prolong.

Honor is, in fact, 3rd generation, despite the error in the earlier book. She is also the daughter of prolong recipients on both sides. She did not receive the treatment until about the time she entered the Academy, which put her through puberty and most of her physical adolescence before it began taking effect.

As for the "jail bait" aspect of her appearance which some people have commented upon, this is a woman who looks to be about 21 or 22 (which gets her out of the "jail bait" category in most jurisdictions). However, remember that she is also half-Chinese. It has always seemed to me that Oriental women appear physically younger (to Western eyes, at least) than Western women do. This is not a value judgment, only a statement of fact (or, at least, opinion), and I cheerfully acknowledge that it may be culture bound. However, one should also remember that the people to whom Honor seems so physically youthful have their own cultural baggage. Alistair McKeon is a 1st or 2nd generation recipient; Hamish Alexander is a 1st generation recipient (and, because of the culture in which he was raised, continues, deep down inside, to carry around a pre-prolong society's views on physical aging); and Andrew LaFollet who, in Flag in Exile, thought of Honor as (I believe) "barely post-adolescent" in appearance is from a culture which (a) did not have prolong at all (prior to the Alliance) and (b) had virtually no ethnic Asians in its population. (And note that, nonetheless, he thought of her as post-adolescent.) The point I'm trying to make is that while Honor does look absurdly young for her actual age, she may not look quite as young as you think (by our standards), because you're seeing her through the eyes of other people with other standards.